Social Studies

 

STANDARD: Upon completion of the Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree with an emphasis in Elementary Education, the candidate will "know, understand and use the major concepts and modes of inquiry from the social studies-(the integrated study of history, geography, the social sciences and other related areas)-to promote elementary studentsí abilities to make informed decisions as citizens of a culturally diverse democratic society and interdependent world" (NCATE Program Standard for Elementary Teacher Preparation, February 2000).

The ten areas described in this document are taken from Expectations of Excellence: Curriculum Standards for the Social Studies, National Council for the Social Studies, 1994. They include the ten thematic strands that form the basis for the social studies standards. They are as follows; (1) culture; (2) time, continuity and change; (3) people, places and environments; (4) individual development and identity; (5) individuals, groups, and institutions; (6) power, governance, and authority; (7) production, distribution, and consumption; (8) science, technology and society; (9) global connections; and (10) civic ideals and practices.

 

SOCIAL STUDIES - CONTENT KNOWLEDGE FOR FIRST 60 HOURS

Based on National Council for the Social Studies Standards

Standard 1: Culture

Outcome

Indicators

Assessment Types*

Sample Assessment Tasks

1. Teacher candidates will understand the common characteristics of different cultures.

2. Teacher candidates will understand how cultures change to accommodate different ideas and beliefs.

3. Teacher candidates will be able to discuss the relationship between belief systems and culture.

a. Analyze and explain the ways groups, societies, and cultures address human needs and concerns.

b. Apply an understanding of culture as an integrated whole that explains the functions and interactions of language, literature, the arts, traditions, beliefs and values, and behavior patterns.

c. Compare and analyze societal patterns for preserving and transmitting culture while adapting to environmental or social change.

d. Demonstrate the value of cultural diversity, as well as cohesion, within and across groups.

e. Interpret patterns of behavior reflecting values and attitudes that contribute or pose obstacles to cross-cultural understanding.

!Brief and extended constructed responses

!Selected responses

!Creation of replica artifacts

!Role play and demonstration

!An archaeological dig simulation. Divide class into two cultures. Each group creates culture complete with artifacts representing aspects of that culture. Actually bury artifacts on campus grounds. The two groups dig up the otherís artifacts and make hypothesis about the ways of life in that culture.

There are commercial simulations or make your own.

 

Standard 2: Time, Continuity and Change

Outcomes

Indicators

Assessment Types*

Sample Assessment Tasks

1. Teacher candidates will develop and use chronological thinking.

2. Teacher candidates will understand historical thinking and how historians study history.

a. Demonstrate an understanding that different scholars may describe the same event or situation in different ways but must provide reasons or evidence for their views

b. Identify and use key concepts such as chronology, causality, change, conflict and complexity to explain, analyze and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity

c. Identify and describe selected historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures, such as the rise of civilizations, the development of transportation systems, the growth and break-down of colonial systems, etc.

d. Identify and use processes important to reconstructing and reinterpreting the past, such as using a variety of sources, providing, validating and weighing evidence for claims, checking credibility of sources, and searching for causality

e. Use knowledge of facts and concepts drawn from history, along with methods of historical inquiry, to inform decision-making about and action-taking on public issues

!Selected responses

!Projects

!Brief and extended constructed responses

!Debate

!Models

!Students write a dialogical essay looking at the same event from more than one perspective.

!Given a series of events and possible causes and effects of those events, students will graphically display a cause and effect sequence.

 

Standard 3: People, Places & Environments

Outcome

Indicators

Assessment Types*

Sample Assessment Tasks

1. Teacher candidates will understand why things are located where they are.

2. Teacher candidates will understand how and why landforms change and how that impacts the people living there.

3. Teacher candidates will understand how where we live determines how we live.

 

a. Refine mental maps of locales, regions and the world that demonstrate understanding of relative location, direction, size, and shape.

b. Create, interpret, use, and synthesize information from various representations of the earth, such as maps, globes, and photographs.

c. Calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and distinguish spatial distribution patterns.

d. Describe, differentiate, and explain the relationships among various regional and global patterns of geographic phenomena such as landforms, soils, climate, vegetation, natural resources, and population.

 

 

 

!Projects

!Model making

!Presentations

!Brief and extended constructed responses

!Given a series of maps with varying amounts of information on them, students will make decisions about where to locate various things and explain why.

 

Standard 4: Individual Development and Identity

Outcomes

Indicators

Assessment Type

Sample Assessment Sample

1. Teacher candidates will understand how oneís culture, groups and institutions shape personal identity.

2. Teacher candidates will explicate what influences how people learn, perceive and grow.

3. Teacher candidates will understand the developmental stages that people go through from birth through adulthood.

a. Articulate personal connections to time, place, and social/

cultural systems.

b. Identify, describe, and express appreciation for the influences of various historical and contemporary cultures on an individualís daily life.

c. Describe the ways family, religion, gender, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic status, and other group and cultural influences contribute to the development of a sense of self.

d. Examine the interactions of ethnic, national, or cultural influences in specific situations or events.

e. Analyze the role of perceptions, attitudes, values, and beliefs in the development of personal identity.

f. Compare and evaluate the impact of stereotyping, conformity, acts of altruism, and other behaviors on individuals and groups.

g. Work independently and cooperatively within groups and institutions to accomplish goals.

!Role play

!Brief and extended constructed responses

!Selected responses

!Students will write an autobiography that demonstrates their understanding of their individual development and how identity is developed in a social context.

!Students will create a personal timeline and connect with historical events of the same time period.

 

Standard 5: Individuals, Groups and Institutions

Outcomes

Indicators

Assessment Type

Sample Assessment Task

1. Teacher candidates will understand the integral role that institutions play in peoplesí lives.

2. Teacher candidates will understand the role of institutions in their society and other societies.

3. Teacher candidates will understand how institutions change.

4. Teacher candidates will understand how and why institutions form, what controls and influences them and how they influence people and culture.

a. Apply concepts such as role, status, and social class in describing the connections and interactions of individuals, groups, and institutions in society.

b. Analyze group and institutional influences on people, events, and elements of culture in both historical and contemporary settings.

c. Describe the various forms institutions take, and explain how they develop and change over time.

d. Identify and analyze examples of tensions between expressions of individuality and efforts used to promote social conformity by groups and institutions.

e. Evaluate the role of institutions in furthering both continuity and change.

f. Analyze the extent to which groups and institutions meet individual needs and promote the common good in contemporary and historical settings.

g. Explain and apply ideas and modes of inquiry drawn from behavioral science and social theory in the examination of persistent issues and social problems.

!Model making/ projects

!Brief and extended constructed responses

!Debate

!Role play

!Class will be divided into teams to debate the issue of how institutions meet needs of individuals versus the needs of the community.

!Class/students will engage in either a direct or indirect service-learning project.

 

Standard 6: Power, Authority and Governance

Outcomes

Indicators

Assessment Type

Sample Assessment Task

1. Teacher candidates will understand the historical development of structures of power, authority and governance and their evolving functions in the United States and other parts of the world.

2. Teacher candidates will understand how and why governments are created, structured, maintained and changed.

a. Examine persistent issues involving the rights, roles, and status of the individual in relation to the general welfare.

b. Explain the purpose of government and analyze how its powers are acquired, used, and justified.

c. Analyze and explain ideas and mechanisms to meet needs and wants of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, establish order and security, and balance competing conceptions of a just society.

d. Compare different political systems (their ideologies, structure, institutions, processes, and political cultures) with that of the United States, and identify representative political leaders from selected historical and contemporary settings.

!Debate

!Research paper

!Role play

!Brief and extended constructed responses

!Presentation

!Students will write a research paper comparing and contrasting a different political system to that of the United States.

!Given political cartoons, students will analyze the point of view of the cartoonists.

!Given a written piece of recent political interest, students will create a cartoon.

 

 

Standard 7: Science, Technology and Society

Outcomes

Indicators

Assessment Type

Sample Assessment Task

1. Teacher candidates will discuss how society changes in response to technology development.

 

 

a. Identify and describe both current and historical examples of the interaction and interdependence of science, technology, and society in a variety of cultural settings.

b. Make judgments about how science and technology have transformed the physical world and human society and our understanding of time, space, place, and human-environment interactions.

c. Analyze how science and technology influence the core values, beliefs, and attitudes of society, how core values, beliefs, and attitudes of society shape scientific and technological change.

.

!Research paper

!Debate

!Brief and extended constructed responses

!Selected responses

!Students will engage in a debate about the ethical issues connected with technological advances.

!Students will write and propose potential legislation to address an issue raised by advancements in technology.

 

 

Standard 8: Civic Ideal and Practices

Outcomes

Indicators

Assessment Type

Sample Assessment Task

1. Teacher candidates will discuss how the meaning of citizenship has evolved.

2. Teacher candidates will understand the balance between rights and responsibilities.

3. Teacher candidates will discuss the role of the citizen in the community and the nation, and as a member of the world community.

a. Explain the origins and interpret the continuing influence of key ideals of the democratic republican form of government, such as individual human dignity, liberty, justice, equality, and the rule of law.

b. Identify, analyze, interpret, and evaluate sources and examples of citizensí rights and responsibilities.

c. Locate, access, analyze, organize, synthesize, evaluate, and apply information about selected public issues-- identifying, describing, and evaluating multiple points of view.

d. Practice forms of civic discussion and participation consistent with the ideals of citizens in a democratic republic.

e. Analyze and evaluate the influence of various forms of citizen action on public policy.

f. Evaluate the effectiveness of public opinion in influencing and shaping public policy development and decision-making.

g. Participate in activities to strengthen the "common good," based upon careful evaluation of possible options for citizen action.

!Debate

!Discussion

!Surveys

!Projects

!Brief and extended constructed responses

!Selected responses

!Students will create and conduct a survey about peopleís political habits.

!Students will participate in one public forum where issues are being discussed. This can be either direct or indirect participation

!Student will analyze voting patterns and behavior from data sources